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How Music Can Change Our Lives Essay Definition

The Music You Love Tells Me Who You Are

Ever been a bit judgey when you hear someone’s taste in music? Of course you have.

And you were right — music tells you a lot about someone’s personality.

Research has learned a great deal about the power of music:

  1. Your musical tastedoes accurately tell me about you, including your politics.
  2. Your musical taste is influenced by your parents.
  3. You love your favorite song because it’s associated with an intense emotional experience in your life.
  4. The music you enjoyed when you were 20 you will probably love for the rest of your life.
  5. And, yes, rockstars really do live fast and die young.

But enough trivia. It also turns out music affects your behavior — and much more than you might think.

Studies show music can lead you to drink more, spendmore, be kind, or even act unethically.

No, rock and heavy metal don’t lead people to commit suicide — but it’s possible that country music might:

The results of a multiple regression analysis of 49 metropolitan areas show that the greater the airtime devoted to country music, the greater the white suicide rate.

Music is so powerful it’s even possible to become addicted to music.

Eric Barker:What 10 things should you do every day to improve your life?

But can we really use scientific research on music to improve our lives? Absolutely.

Here are 9 ways:

1) Music Helps You Relax

Yes, research shows music is relaxing.

I know, I know, obvious, right? But what you might not know is the type of music that helps people relax best.

Need to chill out? Skip the pop and jazz and head for the classical.

Via Richard Wiseman’s excellent book 59 Seconds: Change Your Life in Under a Minute:

Blood pressure readings revealed that listening to pop or jazz music had the same restorative effect as total silence. In contrast, those who listened to Pachelbel and Vivaldi relaxed much more quickly, and so their blood pressure dropped back to the normal level in far less time.

(More things that relieve stress are here.)

2) Angry Music Improves Your Performance

We usually think of anger as something that’s just universally bad. But the emotion has positive uses too.

Anger focuses attention on rewards, increases persistence, makes us feel in control and more optimistic about achieving our goals.

When test subjects listened to angry music while playing video games, they got higher scores.

Via The Science of Sin: The Psychology of the Seven Deadlies (and Why They Are So Good For You):

What Tamir and her colleagues found was that people preferred to listen to the angry music before playing Soldier of Fortune. Faced with a task in which anger might serve a useful function, facilitating the shooting of enemies, participants opted for an anger boost. What’s more, listening to the angry music actually improved performance…

(More on how to boost productivity here.)

3) Music Reduces Pain

When ibuprofen isn’t doing the job, might be time to put on your favorite song.

Research shows it can reduce pain:

Preferred music was found to significantly increase tolerance and perceived control over the painful stimulus and to decrease anxiety compared with both the visual distraction and silence conditions.

(More research based tricks for reducing pain here.)

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4) Music Can Give You A Better Workout

What’s the best thing to have on your iPod at the gym?

The weight room is no place to try new genres. Playing your favorites can boost performance:

The performance under Preferred Music (9.8 +/- 4.6 km) was greater than under Nonpreferred Music (7.1 +/- 3.5 km) conditions. Therefore, listening to Preferred Music during continuous cycling exercise at high intensity can increase the exercise distance, and individuals listening to Nonpreferred Music can perceive more discomfort caused by the exercise.

(More ways to improve your health here.)

5) Music Can Help You Find Love

Want to get the interest of that special someone? Put on the romantic music.

Women were more likely to give their number to men after hearing love songs:

…the male confederate asked the participant for her phone number. It was found that women previously exposed to romantic lyrics complied with the request more readily than women exposed to the neutral ones.

(More on how science can make you a better kisser here.)

6) Music Can Save A Life

Do you know the proper way to give CPR chest compressions? Turns out timing is key.

And how can you best remember that timing during an emergency?

Sing “Stayin’ Alive” by the BeeGees. Yes, I’m serious:

…Dr. John Hafner of the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Peoria had 15 physicians and med students perform the 100-compression procedure (on mannequins) while listening to the Bee Gees classic “Stayin’ Alive.” As Hafner reports in the Journal of Emergency Medicine, their mean compression rate was an excellent 109.1. Five weeks later, they repeated the exercise while singing the song to themselves as a “musical memory aid.” Their mean rate increased to 113.2. The medical professionals reported that the “mental metronome” improved both “their technical ability and confidence in providing CPR.”

(More things that can improve your health and happiness here.)

7) Music Can Improve Your Work — Sometimes

Does music at the office make you work better or just distract you? It’s a much debated issue and the answer is not black and white.

For the most part, it seems music decreases work performance – but makes you happier while you work:

…a comparison of studies that examined background music compared to no music indicates that background music disturbs the reading process, has some small detrimental effects on memory, but has a positive impact on emotional reactions…

That said, a little bit of music can make you more creative. If you have ADHD, noise helps you focus:

Noise exerted a positive effect on cognitive performance for the ADHD group and deteriorated performance for the control group, indicating that ADHD subjects need more noise than controls for optimal cognitive performance.

And music with positive lyrics makes you more helpful and collaborative.

(More on what will make you successful here.)

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8) Use Music To Make You Smarter

There is a ton of evidence that music lessons improve IQ.

But there’s even research that sayslistening to classical music might boost brainpower as well:

Within 15 minutes of hearing the lecture, all the students took a multiple-choice quiz featuring questions based on the lecture material. The results: the students who heard the music-enhanced lecture scored significantly higher on the quiz than those who heard the music-free version.

(More on the most powerful way to easily get smarter here.)

9) Music Can Make You A Better Person

Need to soften someone’s heart? Maybe even your own?

Playing music can make you more compassionate:

In a year-long program focused on group music-making, 8- to 11-year old children became markedly more compassionate, according to a just-published study from the University of Cambridge. The finding suggests kids who make music together aren’t just having fun: they’re absorbing a key component of emotional intelligence.

Venezuela made music lessons mandatory. What happened? Crime went down and fewer kids dropped out of school:

A simple cost-benefit framework is used to estimate substantive social benefits associated with a universal music training program in Venezuela (B/C ratio of 1.68). Those social benefits accrue from both reduced school drop-out and declining community victimization. This evidence of important social benefits adds to the abundant evidence of individual gains reported by the developmental psychology literature.

(More on how to be a better person here.)

Sum Up

So music not only says a lot about you, it provides a myriad of easy ways to make your life better:

  1. Music Can Help You Relax
  2. Angry Music Improves Your Performance
  3. Music Reduces Pain
  4. Music Can Give You A Better Workout
  5. Music Can Help You Find Love
  6. Music Can Save A Life
  7. Music Can Improve Your Work — Sometimes
  8. Use Music To Make You Smarter
  9. Music Can Make You A Better Person

Most importantly: Music makes us feel good, and in the end, that’s worth a lot.

Speaking of music that makes you feel good, ever wondered what English sounds like to people who don’t speak it?

Then you’ll love this song.

“An Italian singer wrote this song with gibberish to sound like English. If you’ve ever wondered what other people think Americans sound like, this is it.”

Join 45K+ readers. Get a free weekly update via email here.

This piece originally appeared on Barking Up the Wrong Tree

There have been many studies attempting to figure out just how music affects the human mind. For example, why do different people like different kinds of music, what parts of the brain are activated and if said parts are affected more or less by different kinds of music, and others.

Some of these questions have remained unanswered, and might stay that way for a while. One thing, however, is for certain: music does affect our daily lives.

Just look at the simple facts. Most people listen to music. If someone doesn’t, they’re sometimes viewed in a strange way. How could you not listen to music?

Music affects our emotions. When we listen to sad songs, we tend to feel a decline in mood. When we listen to happy songs, we feel happier. Upbeat songs with energetic riffs and fast-paced rhythms (such as those we hear at sporting events) tend to make us excited and pumped up.

With all this in mind, I sent out a survey to the students of Basehor-Linwood High School, asking some simple questions about their music taste and how music makes them feel. Studying these results show some interesting facts.

When asked about their listening habits, mixed results were found in accordance to the amount of time spent listening to music on a daily basis.

About 22.2 percent of people said that they listen to music between one to two hours everyday, where another 22.2 percent said they listen at least five hours a day.

The category of two to three hours a day sees about 18.4 percent of people in the school, and three to four hours meets a close second to that, at 16.5 percent.

Only 11 percent of people listen to less than an hour’s worth of music every day, and even less listen to four to five hours a day; about 9.5 percent.

It seems that there isn’t really a happy medium. Either people listen to music a little, or they listen to music all the time. Music takes different standpoints in different people’s lives, and it matters more or less to one person than it does another.

A majority of people listen to music in the car, as well as at home; about 90 percent of all those studied for each. Around 71 percent of people here in the school also listen in their classrooms. Both the hallway and the lunchroom receive substantially less; about 37 percent and 25 percent.

It seems that music helps us concentrate and study as well. Out of those studied, 88.5 percent of people said that they listen to music when they study, work on homework, and other activities such as that. That leaves on 11.5 percent of people who don’t.

It’s no surprise that most people (69 percent) listen to pop music. Pop literally stands for popular. 55.2 percent of all people attending BLHS listen to rock and rap. It’s also not surprising to hear that 46.6% of people listen to alternative and indie music. Over half of our students listen to country, at 52.3 percent.

Some genres that didn’t hit the chart with full force are funk, jazz, classic, punk, dubstep, and metal. Not one of these, with the exception of classical (at 28.7 percent), crossed the 25 percent line.

No matter what people listen to, there seems to be a common consensus as to why they listen. It seems that genres that have a fast paced, upbeat, and catchy rhythm (like pop, rap, etc.) are attractive to those who do sports, or at least, those who are looking to get pumped up. Rock also stands to achieve this goal. Most people agree that music just makes them happy. They can ‘get into a mood’ based of the style of the song they’re listening too. I must say that I agree.

Personally, I listen to rock and metal, pop punk, and acoustics, that is, if I must limit my choices. I always listen to rock and a whole lot of metalcore. To get pumped up, I listen to rock and metal, sometimes more ’80s metal than modern. To help when I’m feeling down, I listen to acoustic and pop punk. When angry, I listen to metalcore and sometimes stuff even heavier than that.

Overall, here’s the final conclusion I could come up with; music is simply a force that cannot be explained. It messes with our heads, it makes us feel different emotions, sometimes even physically changes us. Music unites us. Some of those surveyed said that they’ve had friendships established based off music, as have I. In the end, we know that music has a wide range of effects on us. Honestly, maybe we should leave it at that.